McCall-Thompson family history
Genealogy of some McCalls, Thompsons, Warrens, Campbells, Brierlys, Huffstutlers and allied families
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1 G BRIERLY
Birth Date: 7 Aug 1915
Death Date: 20 Aug 2003
Social Security Number: 017-10-7234
State or Territory Where Number Was Issued: Massachusetts

Death Residence Localities
ZIP Code: 07054
Localities: Parsippany, Morris, New Jersey
Parsippany Troy Hills, Morris, New Jersey
Troy Hills, Morris, New Jersey 
Brierly, Gordon Frederick (I4273)
 
2



8 September, 1905
“Early Callaway History – Old Settlements and Settlers,” by William Nash Moore
Mokane (Missouri) Herald-Post


Joseph Duncan.
Joseph C. Duncan came from Buckingham county, Virginia, and, after stopping about a year in Kentucky, arrived in Callaway county, Missouri, and located near Readsville in 1830. He and Jarrod May entered eighty acres of land each, being the first land entered in that neighborhood. Joseph C. Duncan had six sons: Frederick, Onslow, Joe, who died young, Jerome, Ned and Merritt, Frederick moved to the state of Oregon just before the close of the war. The father and all his living sons, except Frederick, were known to be in sympathy with the South. Having lived in that part of the country, they loved it and its institutions. Frederick claimed to be in sympathy with the North, and enlisted in the militia, which act his Southern-sympathizing neighbors disapproved as well as all his father’s family. This bitterness continued to exist until after the close of the war, and it may be that it exists to a small extent up to the present time. It was known by very few of Frederick’s friends at the time, that he did this in order to promote peace among neighbors. He believed by doing as he did, he could benefit all his neighbors than by any other he could pursue. It was always known in his neighborhood a short time before when the militia would pay that part of the county a visit, and on such occasions, Frederick always accompanied them. nor was there any murdering or robbing committed on these scouts when Frederick was with them. There were some of the Southern people who still retain reason. Frederick knew this. He would approach some of these, and tell them how suicidal it was to contend without arms with well-armed men and that would surely bring trouble upon themselves, their families and their friends. He also used his influence with the opposite party, trying to persuade them to desist from all lawlessness and cruelties, that it was not the business of soldiers to make war on unarmed men, who were remaining at home and attending to their private affairs, neither was it their business to make war on defenseless women and children. From some cause, probably at his own request, he was discharged from the militia, and soon after moved to the state of Oregon, where he died a short time after. This exoneration of Fred Duncan is written the more cheerfully as the writer had some acquaintance with him both before and during the war, and he always seemed to be a good sort of a man.
The father, Joseph C. Duncan died soon after the close of the war. Merritt was a lawyer and resided in Mexico, MO. He also preached occasionally. Onslow went to Texas and it is believed he died there. Jerome was a house carpenter. He resided in Audrain county, Mo., and died there some years ago. Ned is a physician, and is in Monroe county, Mo. There were two daughters born to Joseph C. Duncan and wife. The elder married Isham McMahan, and a daughter of this couple became the wife of Capt. William M. Scholl. The younger of the daughters of Joseph C. Duncan married Marshall S. Coats. Nearly all the Duncan family are dead, and none of those living reside in this county….
…Elder William Coats was one among the earliest settlers on the prairie to which he gave his name. He preached I at many places throughout the county in the early 20’s. There were several other settlers in this part of the county in early times, of whom very little is known. There were Jackson Petty, Marshal S. Coats, the McCalls, Berrys and several others. Michael Klein was born in Germany near the river Rhine, and he married a woman who was born on the opposite side of the river in French territory. He came to St. Louis, Mo. when quite a young man where he remained about two years and thence to Portland, Mo., where he established a wagon factory, and after remaining in this business for many years, he added to it furniture and hardware. He had the misfortune a few years ago of being burned out, both buildings and stock were destroyed. He then purchased another building and put in a small stock of hardware, and is in that business at the present time. He is now past his three-score and ten years, and is some what broken in health and strength.

[From Scharri Brennan - 16 Jan 2011]

Joseph Curd DUNCAN (Edward-2, John-1) was born on 17 Aug 1789 in Buckingham Co. Va. He appeared in the census in 1810 in Buckingham Co VA. He owned Personal Property tax in 1813 in Prince Edward Co., VA. Joseph owned Prince Edward Co. Va. in Jan 1813. He owned Personal Property in 1814 in Prince Edward Co., VA. He owned Bought more property in Prince Edward Co VA in 1815. Joseph owned Personal Property in 1815 in Prince Edward Co, VA. He owned Personal Property in 1816 in Prince Edward Co, VA. He owned Personal Property in 1817 in Prince Edward Co, VA. Joseph owned Sold property in Prince Edward Co Va- with wife Nancy in Aug 1817. He appeared in the census in 1820 in Christian Co KY. He Court book-Road viewer in 1820 in Christian Co KY. Joseph Deed of Conveyance in 1824 in Christian Co KY. He Road help? in 1825 in Christian Co KY. He was Organizing of Church of Christ Church in 1828–1829 in Antioch, Callaway, MO. Since they were still in KY in 1829-Not sure how they were organizing this church in MO in 1828-might be a typo in the book. Joseph owned Selling property in in 1829 in Christian Co KY. He appeared in the census in 1830 in Callaway Co MO.

He owned W 1/2 SE Sec 32 T47N-R7W 80A on 19 Oct 1831–2 Sep 1835 in Callaway Co MO. Joseph C Duncan is listed in the index as being on page 15-Sec 32. His name is shown twice.

The date on this plat map is 4 years earlier than the certificate from BLM shows. Not sure why--- it shows as a Cash sale, which should not have restrictions like farming or building to "prove" before a cert is issued. The authority is from 1820- about the time Missouri is becoming a state.

This is the only property listed in the probate record at the time of his death in 1868. Joseph owned W 1/2 NW Sec 32 T47N R7W 80A on 19 Jun 1835–7, Sep 1838 in Callaway Co MO. This property is listed in the Plat Map book for Callaway Co, MO

He appeared in the census in 1840 in Auxvasse, Callaway Co, MO.
He appeared in the census in 1844 in Callaway Co MO.
Joseph was organizing the Liberty Christian Church in 1848 in Coat's Prairie, Callaway Co MO.
He appeared in the census in 1850 in 12th District, Callaway Co MO.
He appeared in the census in 1850 in Slave Schedule Callaway Co MO.
Joseph appeared in the census in 1850 in Agriculture Census-Callaway Co MO.
He appeared in the census in 1860 in Dist 18, Callaway Co, MO.
He appeared in the census in 1860 in Slave Schedule Callaway Co MO.
Joseph signed a will on 27 Nov 1866 in Callaway Co MO.
He had his estate probated in 1868–1869 in Callaway Co MO.
He was buried in Jan 1868 in Old Salem Cemetery near Reform MO. Joseph died on 22 Jan 1868 at the age of 78 in Fulton, Calloway Co, Mo. 
Duncan, Joseph Curd (I1009)
 
3

Adelphia graduated from Mount Holyoke College in 1916; completed Vassar Training Camp for Nurses in 1918; graduated from Case Western Reserve University School of Nursing in 1920; and earned a BS degree from Simmons College School of Public Nursing in 1924. She did public health nursing in Boston. She was a volunteer at the American Red Cross blood bank in Grafton. She was a member of the Evangelical Congregational Church in Grafton, the Grafton District Nursing Association, the Grafton Garden Club and the King's Daughters. Her interests included family, rug hooking, knitting, stenciling, sewing and cooking.

Worcester Telegram & Gazette (MA) - December 6, 1997
Deceased Name: ADELPHIA A. CAMPBELL, 104 GRAFTON'S OLDEST RESIDENT
GRAFTON - Adelphia A. (Allen) Campbell, 104, formerly of 46 North St., a public-health nurse for many years, a Red Cross volunteer, and Grafton's oldest living resident, died Wednesday in River Terrace Health Care Center, Lancaster, from complications of pneumonia.
Her husband of 65 years, Kleber A. Campbell Jr., died in 1991. She leaves a son, Kleber A. Campbell III of West Boylston; a daughter, Joan Campbell-Phillips of South Harpswell, Maine; eight grandchildren; and 16 greatgrandchildren. She was born in Earleville, N.Y., daughter of Herbert C. Allen Jr. and Agnes Jeannette (Burdick) Allen, and lived here 70 years before moving to Lancaster last year. She was the oldest living resident of Grafton. She graduated from Lafayette High School, Buffalo, N.Y., in 1912 and Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, in 1916. She graduated from Case Western Reserve University School of Nursing, Cleveland, in 1920 and earned another bachelor's degree from Simmons College School of Public Nursing in Boston. She completed the nurses' training program at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, N.Y.
Mrs. Campbell was a registered public health nurse for the City of Boston for many years before she retired. She was then a volunteer for many years at the American Red Cross blood bank in Grafton.
She was a member of the Evangelical Congregational Church, the Grafton District Nursing Association, the Grafton Garden Club and the King's Daughters. Her interests included family, rug hooking, knitting, stenciling, sewing and cooking.
A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. Dec. 13 in the Evangelical Congregational Church, 30 Grafton
Common. After cremation, burial will be at the convenience of the family in Riverside Cemetery. There are no calling hours. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Mount Holyoke College, Scholarship Fund, South Hadley 01075; or the Evangelical Congregational Church, 30 Grafton Common, Grafton 01519. Robert C. Roney, 152 Worcester St., North Grafton, is directing arrangements.
Copyright (c) 1997 Worcester Telegram & Gazette Corp.

US Federal Census Data:
1900 - living in Hamilton, Madison, New York with parents, siblings Herbert and Winifred and mother's mother
1910 - living in Buffalo Ward 27, Erie, New York with parents and siblings Herbert and Winifred
1930 - living in Grafton, Worcester, Massachusetts with husband and son 
Allen, Adelphia Martina (I3228)
 
4 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I9365)
 
5

The US Federal Census for 1850 lists a Catherine Sanborn aged 20 and born in Ireland. This could be Franklin's spouse. 
Sanborn, Benjamin Franklin (I9304)
 
6

William Wilder was a medical doctor.

William Wilder and family were in Chesterfield, New York at the time of the 1810 U. S. Federal Census. They were in Danby, Tompkins County, New York, according to the 1820 U. S. Federal Census and 1825 New York State Census.  In 1830 William, Mary and daughter Betsy were in Springfield, Bradford County, Pennsylvania. Son Theodore who also was a medical doctor and presumably practicing medicine nearby in New York at that time.

Based on the foregoing 1810 census Wilder family profile, it is possible for Argyle Campbell to be a part of it. 
Wilder, William MD (I8564)
 
7

Obituary

The Rev. Dr. Barbara Warren McCall, a pioneering clergy woman in the United Church of Christ, died October 26, 2007, at Pilgrim Place retirement community in Claremont, California. She was 93.
She was born in Holden, Massachusetts, in 1914, the first child of William H. Warren and Edith Brierly Warren. She graduated from Mt. Holyoke College in 1935 and studied at the Chicago Theological Seminary. Barbara and her late husband, the Rev. Dr. Clarence Field McCall, Jr., were ordained together in the Congregational Church of Roundup, Montana, in 1938. They served briefly as co-pastors there. Then, for many years she focused on raising their four children, supporting her husband's ministries, and leading workshops and training events. At the time of his death in 1967, "Mac" McCall was UCC Conference Minister for Southern California. Entering a dramatically new chapter, Barbara was called as interim Associate Minister of the First United Church of Oak Park, Illinois. The following year she joined the staff of the UCC Council for Lay Life and Work based in New York City, and consulted with churches and conferences in the New England region.
In 1972 she was appointed special assistant to UCC President Robert Moss as executive for the Task Force on Women in Church and Society. The Task Force report to the 1973 General Synod addressed the urgent need for the church at all levels to actively empower women both in ordained and lay roles. It advocated the adoption of inclusive language, identified systemic points of resistance, and led to the formation of the national Coordinating Center for Women in Church and Society. Later that year Barbara was named UCC editor of A.D. Magazine, and remained in that role until it ceased publication in 1975. She was a pastoral therapist in private practice in Concord, Massachusetts for several years until retiring to Pilgrim Place in Claremont, California, in 1982.
Barbara's contributions to the Church were recognized in 1973 when she was awarded an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree from the Chicago Theological Seminary; and again in 1987 when she received the national Antoinette Brown Award for outstanding leadership by a woman within the United Church of Christ.
She is survived by her daughter, (Dr.) Judith Brierly Campbell and her husband Bruce Suttle of Urbana, Illinois; three sons (the Rev.) Merritt C. McCall and his wife Carolyn of Portland, Oregon; (the Rev. Dr.) Robert M. McCall and his wife Rebecca of Blue Hill, Maine; and (the Rev. Dr.) John B. McCall and his wife Andrea of South Portland, Maine. Other survivors include her two brothers, Henry W. Warren and his wife Mary of Aurora, Colorado, and William H. Warren and his wife Caroline of New Haven, Vermont; grandchildren and great grandchildren.
There will be a memorial service at Pilgrim Place in Claremont, California, in early December. Family and friends will also gather after Memorial Day in the Warren Chapel of the First Congregational Church, United Church of Christ, Holden, Massachusetts. Burial will be in the Grove Cemetery, Holden, at that time.
Gifts in Barbara's memory may be made to the United Church of Christ, Women's Ministries, 700 Prospect Avenue East, Cleveland, Ohio, 44115-1100; to Pilgrim Place, 660 Avery Rd. Claremont, California, 91711; or the charity of choice.
++++++++

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Obituary

The Rev. Dr. Barbara Warren McCall, a pioneering clergy woman in the United Church of Christ, died October 26, 2007, at Pilgrim Place retirement community in Claremont, California. She was 93.
She was born in Holden, Massachusetts, in 1914, the first child of William H. Warren and Edith Brierly Warren. She graduated from Mt. Holyoke College in 1935 and studied at the Chicago Theological Seminary. Barbara and her late husband, the Rev. Dr. Clarence Field McCall, Jr., were ordained together in the Congregational Church of Roundup, Montana, in 1938. They served briefly as co-pastors there. Then, for many years she focused on raising their four children, supporting her husband's ministries, and leading workshops and training events. At the time of his death in 1967, "Mac" McCall was UCC Conference Minister for Southern California. Entering a dramatically new chapter, Barbara was called as interim Associate Minister of the First United Church of Oak Park, Illinois. The following year she joined the staff of the UCC Council for Lay Life and Work based in New York City, and consulted with churches and conferences in the New England region.
In 1972 she was appointed special assistant to UCC President Robert Moss as executive for the Task Force on Women in Church and Society. The Task Force report to the 1973 General Synod addressed the urgent need for the church at all levels to actively empower women both in ordained and lay roles. It advocated the adoption of inclusive language, identified systemic points of resistance, and led to the formation of the national Coordinating Center for Women in Church and Society. Later that year Barbara was named UCC editor of A.D. Magazine, and remained in that role until it ceased publication in 1975. She was a pastoral therapist in private practice in Concord, Massachusetts for several years until retiring to Pilgrim Place in Claremont, California, in 1982.
Barbara's contributions to the Church were recognized in 1973 when she was awarded an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree from the Chicago Theological Seminary; and again in 1987 when she received the national Antoinette Brown Award for outstanding leadership by a woman within the United Church of Christ.
She is survived by her daughter, (Dr.) Judith Brierly Campbell and her husband Bruce Suttle of Urbana, Illinois; three sons (the Rev.) Merritt C. McCall and his wife Carolyn of Portland, Oregon; (the Rev. Dr.) Robert M. McCall and his wife Rebecca of Blue Hill, Maine; and (the Rev. Dr.) John B. McCall and his wife Andrea of South Portland, Maine. Other survivors include her two brothers, Henry W. Warren and his wife Mary of Aurora, Colorado, and William H. Warren and his wife Caroline of New Haven, Vermont; grandchildren and great grandchildren.
There will be a memorial service at Pilgrim Place in Claremont, California, in early December. Family and friends will also gather after Memorial Day in the Warren Chapel of the First Congregational Church, United Church of Christ, Holden, Massachusetts. Burial will be in the Grove Cemetery, Holden, at that time.
Gifts in Barbara's memory may be made to the United Church of Christ, Women's Ministries, 700 Prospect Avenue East, Cleveland, Ohio, 44115-1100; to Pilgrim Place, 660 Avery Rd. Claremont, California, 91711; or the charity of choice.
++++++++ 
Warren, Rev. Dr. Barbara (I124)
 
8

Data from United States Federal Census Records
1850 - was a member of Thomas McFarland (maternal grandfather?) household in Belpre, Washington County, Ohio, age 2
1860 - status the same, age 12
1870 - status the same, age 22

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US Federal Census data:
1850
Member Thomas McFarland (maternal grandfather?) household in Belpre, Washington County, Ohio, age 2
1860
Status the same, age 12
1870
Status the same, age 22

-- MERGED NOTE ------------


Data from United States Federal Census Records
1850 - was a member of Thomas McFarland (maternal grandfather?) household in Belpre, Washington County, Ohio, age 2
1860 - status the same, age 12
1870 - status the same, age 22

-- MERGED NOTE ------------



US Federal Census Data:
1850 - was a member of Thomas McFarland (maternal grandfather?) household in Belpre, Washington County, Ohio,
1860 - status the same
1870 - status the same 
Simpson, Rebecca Jane (I8507)
 
9

Data from United States Federal Census Records
1930 - living in Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan as head of household with wife, Christine G., and child Ellis A. age 2 1/2; occupation machine shop manager

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US Federal Census data:
1930
In Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan - head of household with wife, Christine G., and child Ellis A. age 2 1/2
Occupation - machine shop manager

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Data from United States Federal Census Records
1930 - living in Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan as head of household with wife, Christine G., and child Ellis A. age 2 1/2; occupation machine shop manager

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Data from United States Federal Census Records
1930 - living in Detroit, Wayne County, Michigan as head of household with wife, Christine G., and child Ellis A. age 2 1/2; occupation machine shop manager 
May, Edward Moore (I8514)
 
10

Data from United States Federal Census Records
1930 - was living in Oak Park, Cook County. Illinois with her brother Harold and mother Alice; occupation music teacher.
1940 - was living in Oak Park, Cook County. Illinois with her brother Harold and mother Alice; occupation public school teacher.

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US Federal Census Data:
1930 - living in Oak Park, Cook County. Illinois with her brother Harold and mother Alice; occupation music teacher.
1940 - living in Oak Park, Cook County. Illinois with her brother Harold and mother Alice; occupation public school teacher.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------


Data from United States Federal Census Records
1930 - was living in Oak Park, Cook County, Illinois with her brother Harold and mother Alice; occupation music teacher.
1940 - was living in Oak Park, Cook County, Illinois with her brother Harold and mother Alice; occupation public school teacher. 
Campbell, Sara Irene (I8511)
 
11

U. S. Federal Census Data
1830 - living alone in Springfield, Pennsylvania
1840 - profile suggests living with a wife and three children in Springfield, Pennsylvania

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U. S. Federal Census Data:
1830 - living in Springfield, Pennsylvania alone
1840 - profile suggests living in Springfield, Pennsylvania with a wife and three children 
Newell, Jacob (I8565)
 
12

US Federal Census Data:
1930 - living in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois with parents; occupation secretary, advertising

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Data from United States Federal Census Records
1930 census - living with parents; occupation secretary, advertising

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Data from United States Federal Census Records
1930 census - living with parents; occupation secretary, advertising 
Campbell, Julia Alice (I9462)
 
13

A sad timeline emerges for the first ten years of the married life of Elizabeth Jane Campbell. She and husband John had five children, Ann born 1852, Charles born 1853, Harriet born about 1856, John Jr. born about 1858 and Jane born in 1860. John Jr. died after 11 months of scrofula illness in 1859, husband John died in 1860 after five years of consumption, and Charles died in 1871.

On the New York Census for 1865 Elixabeth Jane, now known as Eliza, shows as an employee for James W. Taggard in Chesterfield, New York, and living in his boarding house with daughters Ann and Hattie. In 1870 the U. S. Federal Census shows her as a domestic servant in a boarding house in Manchester, New Hampshire and daughter Hattie living with her. There is no record of Ann's whereabouts. In 1880 the Federal Census shows Eliza living in Bedford, New Hampshire, with husband James F. Heselton, daughter Hattie and grandson John D. Campbell.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------



A sad timeline emerges for the first ten years of the married life of Elizabeth Jane Campbell. She and husband John had five children, Ann born 1852, Charles born 1853, Harriet born about 1856, John Jr. born about 1858 and Jane born in 1860. John Jr. died after 11 months of scrofula illness in 1859, husband John died in 1860 after five years of consumption, and Charles died in 1871.

On the New York Census for 1865 Elizabeth Jane, now known as Eliza, shows as an employee for James W. Taggard in Chesterfield, New York, and living in his boarding house with daughters Ann and Hattie. In 1870 the U. S. Federal Census shows her as a domestic servant in a boarding house in Manchester, New Hampshire and daughter Hattie living with her. There is no record of Ann's whereabouts. In 1880 the Federal Census shows Eliza living in Bedford, New Hampshire, with husband James F. Heselton, daughter Hattie and grandson John D. Campbell. 
Lennox, Elizabeth Jane (I8581)
 
14

Alva's death certificate shows that he was a retired superintendent of schools. 
Hopper, Alva D. (I8515)
 
15

Born in Leeds, (West) Yorkshire, England on 15 Apr 1680, the (probable) son of Michael Gilbert (II) and Dorothy Hargrave. Immigrated from Leeds, (West) Yorkshire, England to Maryland about about 1699, the year in which his name appears for the first time in the tax tables of Baltimore county, Maryland. Was first married to Margaret, maiden name unknown, in 1704 in Baltimore, Maryland. Jarvis and Margaret were the parents of six children: Michael, Jarvis, Solomon, Elizabeth, Jarvis and Samuel (I). After Margaret's death in 1715, Jarvis married a second time to Mary, maiden name unknown (some have suggested that it was Gallion, though this name is not proven). Jarvis and Mary were the parents of ten children: Charles (1717-1720), Mary (1719-1720), Hannah (1721- ), Charles (1723-1797), Aquila (1726-1806), Benjamin (1729-1791), Daniel (1731-1809) , Mary (1733-1785), Martha (1736-1799), and Arabella (1738- ). Jarvis died on 05 Jun 1739 in Baltimore, Maryland, and was most likely interred in the Spesutia Church cemetery, St. Georges Parish, Baltimore county, Maryland, where he served as a vestryman. 
Gilbert, Gervaise (Garvis) (I8086)
 
16

Christine's obituary shows that she had twenty grandchildren and seven great grandchildren. 
Griffith, Christine Dolores (I8516)
 
17

Name: Wm I Bell
[William J. Bell] 
[Wm J Bell] 
Home in 1840 (City, County, State): Fulton, Callaway, Missouri
Free White Persons - Males - Under 5: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 5 thru 9: 2
Free White Persons - Males - 20 thru 29: 1
Free White Persons - Males - 30 thru 39: 1
Free White Persons - Females - Under 5: 2
Free White Persons - Females - 5 thru 9: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 30 thru 39: 1
Slaves - Males - Under 10: 1
Slaves - Females - 24 thru 35: 1
Persons Employed in Agriculture: 3
Free White Persons - Under 20: 6
Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 3
Total Free White Persons: 9
Total Slaves: 2
Total All Persons - Free White, Free Colored, Slaves: 11 
Family: Bell, William J. / McCall, Jane (F123)
 
18

On the 1900 U. S. Federal Census Albert M. Badger is shown living with his aunt Jennie C. Willard nee Jane Campbell in Middlebury, Vermont. Sometime after the 1900 census was taken Albert must have been adopted as Albert M. Badger's birth record shows him as Albert Willard born March 26, 1895 in Nashua, New Hampshire, father as Frank E. Willard and mother as Jane Campbell.  Subsequent records show his full name to be Albert Manley Willard. 
Badger, Albert Manley (I8592)
 
19 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I9344)
 
20

STATE OF VERMONT
Chittenden District, SS. To the Hon. Truman Chittenden, Judge of the Probate Court for the District of Chittenden and State aforesaid The subscribers Administrators of Hezekiah Tracy late of Shelburn in said District, deceased, before the payment of any debts due from the estate of said deceased, except funeral expenses, charges of the last sickness, rates and taxes, and debts due the State and United States, do hereby represent said estate to be insolvent and insufficient to pay all the just debts which the deceased owed; and therefore pray said Court to appoint Commissioners, to receive, examine and adjust the claims of the several creditors to said estate according to law.

Dated at Williston this 3rd day of September A.D. 1827.
[signed] Isaac Tracy
Ezekiel Tracy
________________________________
PROBATE BOND ON THE ESTATE OF HEZEKIAH TRACY: - 1827
Know All Men by These Presents....That Isaac Tracy of Sheldon in the County of Franklin & Ezekiel Tracy of Shelburn in the County of Chittenden in the State of Vermont, as principal, and Erastus Tracy of Shelburn in the County of Chittenden aforesaid, as surety are holden, and firmly bound and obligated unto the Probate Court of the District of Chittenden in the penal sum of Five Thousand dollars, current money of the United States, to be paid unto said Court of the time being, to which payment, well and truly to be made and done, we bind ourselves, and each of us, and each of our heirs, executors, and administrators, jointly and severally, each and every of them, for and in the whole, firmly by these present, signed with our hands and sealed with our seales.
Dated at Shelburn this 3rd Day of September
in the year of your Lord one thousand eight hundred and Twenty Seven.

The condition of the above obligation is such, that if the above bounden Isaac, Tracy & Ezekiel Tracy Administrators of Hezekiah Tracy late of Shelburn in the County of Chittenden and State of Vermont deceased, shall make, or cause to be made, a true and perfect inventory of all and singular the goods, chattels, rights, credits, and estate of said deceased, which have or shall come to the possession or knowledge of the said Isaac Tracy & Ezekiel Tracy or into the possession of any other person or person, for them and the same return, or cause to be returned, to the Register of the Probate Court for the District of Chittenden on or before the 3rd day of December next ensuing, and the same and all other the goods, chattels or rights, credits and estate, of the said deceased , at the time of his death, which, at any time after, shall come into the possession of the said Isaac Tracy and Ezekiel Tracy or into the possession of any other person or person, for them do well and truly administer according to law; and of the same, pay and discharge all debts and charges, charageable thereon, or such dividends thereon as shall be ordered and decreed to be paid, by said Court; and a true and just account of their administration return to said Register, on or before the 3rd day of September A.D. 1828 and perform all the orders and decrees of said Court, to be performed by them in the premises, then the above obligation to be void, otherwise of force. Given in the presence of :
[signed] Isaac Tracy
Ezekiel Tracy
Erastus Tracy _________________________________

At a Court of Probate held in at Williston with, in, and for the District of Chittenden on the 17 day of September A.D. 1827, the--- --- --- --- --- filed in the original of this court --- with the certificate of both which it appears said administrator was duly sworn and the same having been presented to me the subscribed judge of said court, I so therefore truly accept and account of the same and order and --the same to be recorded. [Signed} Truman Chittenden Judge
________________

Estate of Hezekiah Tracy, Shelburne, Vermont - 1827 File #706
Inventory of The Estate Hezekiah Tracy late of Shelbourne, Deceased - 1827
Received in to the Probate Office Sept. 17, 1827, Order to be __________
Recorded Vol 13, Page 275-276-277-278-279-280-281 Probate Record _______________-__________
Attd. D. French - Registar ----

STATE OF VERMONT
DISTRICT OF CHITTENDEN
ss} By the Hon. Truman Chittenden, Judge of the Court of Probate, of the district of Chittenden - to Burgess Hall and Levi Comstock & Leman Judson of Shelburn all in said district, GREETING.

PURSUANT TO THE POWER AND AUTHORITY TO ME given, in and by the laws of this State, I do hereby appoint and authorize you a committee to appraise all the real Estate, whereof Hezekiah Tracy of Shelburn lately deceased, died, seized and possessed in this State, each piece and parcel by itself, at the present true value in money, all in words at length. And if aaid [sic] estate, or any part thereof, lie in common, or undivided with the real estate of any other person, you are first to sever and divide the estate of said intestate, from the estate with which it lies in common, as aforesaid, giving timely notice to all persons interested, to be present if they see cause. When you have perfected your inventory, you are to set off to Hannah Tracy the widow of said deceased one equal third of the real estate of said deceased. And what you so set off, you are to describe by plain and lasting rights and bounds, so that confusion may be prevented upon the reversion of the dower. You are to be under oath faithfully to perform the service, and when you have performed the same, you are to make return of this warrant, with your doings thereon, into the Probate office for the District, aforesid [sic], as soon as may be. Given under my hand, and the seal of said Court, at Williston this 27th day of September A.D. 1827
{signed] Truman Chittenden, Judge.

[on back] Chittenden County vs. Shelburn Sept 24, 1827 The within named Burgess Hall, Levi Comstock and Lemon Judson personally appeared and made oath that they would faithfully perform the service assigned them by ____of this warrant. [Signed] Before me Sam. Blin, Justice Pease 
Tracy, Hezekiah (I1088)
 
21

The Will of Symonde Warren of Nayland in the county of Suffolk and diocese of Norwich, 6 Mar. 41 Elizabeth [ 1598-9). To be buried in the churchyard of Nayland. To my wife Hellen all my house and lands free and copy hold daring her life, she paying to my sons Samuell Warren and Symond Warren, when they attain the,several ages of twenty-one years, 20s. a year during her life. To daughters Hellen Warren and Johane Warren £10 each to be paid at the age of twenty years. After the decease of my wife Hellen I bequeath to my son Samuell and his heirs all my free lands and all that dwelling called Morrells, late of Thomas Brookes, and all my customary lands called Wysson Presnye, and to my son Symond one customary messuage or bearne and twenty-four acres of land called Hawkinge. If my wife marry she is to give sufficient security for payment of legacies to Richard Soule of Nayland, and if she refuse then I give the said lands and tenements to the said Richard Soule for the use of my children till they come to the said ages. Residue of moveable goods to wife Hellen, she to be sole executrix. Richard Soule to be supervisor, and to him 20s. for his pains. Witnesses: John Cryssall, Roger Ecbell, Roberte Iue, Richard Sowle, and William Plampyn. Proved 24 Apr. 1599 by the executrix named. (Archdeaconry of Sudbury (Bury St. Edmunds), Whitney, 193.) 
Warren, Edward (I11783)
 
22

There were no known children resulting from the marriage of Arthur Campbell and Eugenia Hoyt. However, Eugenia had at least two children from her previous marriage to Jesse Lee Porter, one of whom was a daughter named Martha H. Porter born in Missouri October 5, 1907 and died March 13, 1973 in Longview, Cowlitz County, Washington. In Seattle, King County, Washington on November 18, 1925 Martha married Francis N. McCullah (born July 7, 1906 in Missouri and died May 23, 1988 in Seattle, King County, Washington). Martha and Francis had a daughter Eugenia Hoyt McCullah who was born February 18, 1927 in Longview, Cowlitz County, Washington and died January 30, 2001. The 1930 U. S. Federal Census showed Martha as divorced living with daughter Eugenia in Longview, Cowlitz County, Washington and Francis as divorced living with his mother and stepfather in Longview, Cowlitz County, Washington. On September 28, 1931 Martha P. McCullah and Francis N. McCullah remarried in Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri, and in the U. S. Federal Census for 1940 were shown living together in Longview, Cowlitz County, Washington and their daughter Eugenia living with grandmother Eugenia Campbell, also in Longview. On November 17, 1961 in Cowlitz County, Washington Eugenia Hoyt McCullah married Henry Hollister Nash (born September 29, 1922 in Cambridge, Middlesex County, Massachusetts and died January 15, 2000 in Multnomah, Oregon) . Re Eugenia Hoyt NcCullah in the U. S. Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007 the notes show "Mar 1943: Name listed as EUGENIA HOYT MCCULLAH; Oct 1958: Name listed as EUGENIA HOY CAMPBELL; 03 Mar 1975: Name listed as EUGENIA HOYT NASH; 08 Feb 2001: Name listed as EUGENIA H NASH". At the time of her wedding in 1961 Washington marriage records show her name Eugenia Hoyt Campbell. In January 1949 a Northwest Airlines Inc. passenger list from Honolulu to Portland show her as Eugenia H. Campbell. Given the number of times and where Eugenia's name shows as Campbell and considering the events in her natural parents relationship, the question of adoption arises and research continues. Depending if and by whom Eugenia may have been adopted William's line may continue. There are no known issue of granddaughter Eugenia. 
Hoyt, Eugenia Garner (I8558)
 
23

Time line for Jane Campbell

1960 - Jane Campbell was born April 12, 1860 in Keeseville, New York. The date of birth shown on the death certificate is April 12, 1861.  The 1860 U. S. Federal Census shows Jane as one month old so 1860 would seem to be the correct year.  The 1900 Federal Census shows her birth as April 1860.  The best date of birth seems to be April 12, 1860.
 
 On the 1860 U. S. Federal Census Jane is shown with her mother, sisters Ann and Harriet, and brother Charles.  Father John and brother John both died in 1860 and 1859 respectively, before the census.
 
1865 - On the 1865 New York State Census Jane is not with her mother who is working for James Taggard.  Ann and Harriet are with their mother and brother Charles has died.  Jane is not yet accounted for.
 
1870 - On the U. S. Federal Census for 1870 Jane is listed as Junnie(Jennie) Manley living in Middlebury, VT with Albert F. and Laura Manley. She is aged 10 and shows born in Vermont which is erroneous.

1882 - Jane's mother's probate records show three heirs, her daughters, Mrs. Anna B. Badger, Manchester, NH; Miss Hattie E. Campbell, Manchester, NH; and Jane - now Miss Jennie C. Manley of Middlebury, Vermont. 

1900 - On the 1900 U. S. Federal Census Jane is shown as Jennie C. Willard living with Albert Manley and Albert M. Badger in Middlebury, Vermont.   Albert Manley, is shown as head of household and widowed. Jennie relationship to him as dau law ((daughter-in-law(no other children of Albert known) or daughter-by-law?)).  Jennie is shown as married in 1888.  Also this was her first marriage per the 1930 U. S. Federal Census.  Jennie's death certificate shows her spouse as Frank Willard age 93 and living.  No trace of Frank Willard has been found in the U. S. Federal Census records thru 1940.  Albert M. Badger's relationship to the head of household shows as boarder.  He certainly seems to be the son of Jennie's sister Ann(Anna) and was born in March 1895.  Jennie's sister Ann died in Nashua, New Hampshire May 19, 1896.  Sometime after the 1900 census was taken he must have been adopted by Jennie as Albert M. Badger's birth record shows him as Albert Willard born March 26, 1895 in Nashua, father as Frank E. Willard and mother as Jane Campbell.  Subsequent records his full name to be Albert Manley Willard.

1905 - Jennie appears in Vermont Probate Court records as Administratrix for the Estate of Martha M. Manley. In her petition for appointment she cites that Martha "on the 10th day of December 1896 at said Middlebury died intestate; that your petitioner is only child and daughter of said deceased; that said deceased left surviving no other heir or next of kin except your petitioner who is the only person known to your petitioner as interested in the estate of said deceased".

1910 - On the 1900 U. S. Federal Census Jennie and son Albert are shown as boarders in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

Nothing has yet been found for Jennie and son Albert on the 1920 Federal Census. However an article in The Portsmouth Herald on May 26, 1923 On both the 1930 and 1940 Federal Censuses Jennie and Albert are living together in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

1947 - Jennie died June 23, 1947 in Portsmouth, New Hampshire and is buried in Harmony Grove Cemetery in Portsmouth. New Hampshire Death and Disinterment Records, 1754-1947 also shows her name as Jennie C. Willard (Jennie C. Manley); father as Campbell Manley; husband as Frank Willard alive aged 93; and informant as A. M. Willard, Portsmouth, NH. Does showing the father as Campbell Manley refer to Campbell who was the natural father and Manley as the adoptive? father?

The transition from Jane Campbell to Jennie C. Manley has not yet been fully resolved but considering the foregoing it appears that Jane was legally adopted. Jennie seemed to have all the necessary prerequisites to petition the court to be the administratrix of Martha Manley's estate and the declarations she made in so doing. She most likely was with the Manleys before 1865 as she was then no longer with her mother and sisters. In addition there seems to have been some connection between Jennie's mother and Albert Manley. Jennie seems to have continued to be a part of her natural family. In her natural mother's estate records in 1882 Jennie was listed as an heir as aforementioned. She also took in and apparently adopted her sister Ann(Anna) Badger's child Albert Manley Badger. Interesting the child was so named as it could infer a special family connect with Albert Manley.

Re the Manleys: Albert F. Manley was born in Hubbardton, Rutland County, Vermont on March 30, 1818; died in Middlebury, Addison County, Vermont on August 21, 1904 and was buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Pittsford, Rutland County, Vermont. He married Martha Beckley on February 2, 1845 in Weathersfield, Windsor County, Vermont. Martha was born March 16, 1825 in Weathersfield, Windsor County, Vermont; died December 10, 1896 in Middlebury, Addison County, Vermont and was buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Pittsford, Rutland County, Vermont. One further note - on the 1850 U. S. Federal Census Albert is listed as age 31 and Martha age 24. On the aforementioned 1870 census Albert is listed age 50 and "Laura" Manley listed age 45. Correct Albert's age to 52 then the age differential remains at 7 years. Martha and "Laura" seem to be the same person. No other relevant sightings of Laura Manley have been made.


The year following Jennie's death the Veterans of Foreign Wars of Portsmouth, New Hampshire dedicated a plaque in her memory.  In the dedicatory address it was stated "She was a graduate of Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vt., and the New York School of Art". (Middlebury College has no record re Jennie under any of her surnames.)  The 1940 Federal Census Jennie shows as having completed three years of college. 
 

 
No record re Frank Willard has been found and according to her death certificate he was still living in 1947 but her son Albert's obituary in 1954 states he was "the son of the late Frank and Jennie C. (Manley) Willard".  The VFW dedicatory address indicates she was a widow of a civil war veteran which is not in agreement with her death certificate which stated her husband to still be living. 
 
 
  
Campbell, Jane (I8585)
 
24

U. S. Federal Census for 1940 shows Mabel as a resident of the Oregon State Hospital of the Insane in Salem, Oregon and that she also was there as of April 1, 1935. She is also shown as married, as does John elsewhere in the census. 
Fosberry, Mabel E. (I8591)
 
25

U. S. Federal Census information
1910 - Living in Goose Lake, Lake County, Oregon with a boarder
1920 - Living with wife Mabel in Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon
1930 - Living with wife Mabel in Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon
1940 - Living in Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon shown as married but wife not listed. Mabel shown elsewhere as resident in Oregon State Hospital for the Insane

U. S. World War I Draft Registration Card, 1917-1918, signed by John D. Campbell confirms date of birth and shows his residence as Susanville, Lassenville County, California, and nearest relative as Mrs. Mabel E. Campbell. His occupation was an edgerman at the Lassen Lumber & Box Company.

U. S. World War II Registration Card signed by J. D. Campbell confirms his date and place of his birth. Also would add credence that Mabel was elsewhere as another person was named as the one that would always know where signer was.

Regarding John's father -- No records of his birth have been found in New Hampshire records. It seems his birth was recorded in Oregon by John years later. On that record his father shows as "William James Campbell" and his mother as "Harriet Ellen Rowe". On all U. S Federal Censuses the recording of his mother's place of birth is consistent and correct as New York. However re his father's place of birth the census shows for -- 1880 as no father, 1910 as Texas, 1920 as Kentucky, 1930 as U. S. and 1940 it was not a question to be answered.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------



U. S. Federal Census Data:
1910 - living in Goose Lake, Lake County, Oregon with a boarder
1920 - living in Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon with wife Mabel
1930 - living in Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon with wife Mabel
1940 - living in Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon shown as married but wife not listed. Mabel shown elsewhere as resident in Oregon State Hospital for the Insane

U. S. World War I Draft Registration Card, 1917-1918, signed by John D. Campbell confirms date of birth and shows his residence as Susanville, Lassenville County, California, and nearest relative as Mrs. Mabel E. Campbell. His occupation was an edgerman at the Lassen Lumber & Box Company.

U. S. World War II Registration Card signed by J. D. Campbell confirms his date and place of his birth. Also would add credence that Mabel was elsewhere as another person was named as the one that would always know where signer was.

Regarding John's father -- No records of his birth have been found in New Hampshire records. It seems his birth was recorded in Oregon by John years later. On that record his father shows as "William James Campbell" and his mother as "Harriet Ellen Rowe". On all U. S Federal Censuses the recording of his mother's place of birth is consistent and correct as New York. However re his father's place of birth the census shows for -- 1880 as no father, 1910 as Texas, 1920 as Kentucky, 1930 as U. S. and 1940 it was not a question to be answered. 
Campbell, John Davenport (I8590)
 
26
Eli Dyson and James Hall, both of Millbury in the County of Worcester and both citizens of the United States, gave testimony that they had known Benjamin Brierly for five years and that he had resided at Millbury and Oxford. 
Brierly, Benjamin F. (I3984)
 
27
1 - Neill Campbell of Duntroon, born 19 April 1734, married, 9 May 1760, Matilda, youngest daughter of John Campbell of Barcaldine, who died 23 September 1769, leaving issue-
1. Beatrice, born 2 September 1761. married Rev._ Peter Grant, minister of Duthel, and had issue.
2. Jean, born 2 September 1762, married Duncan MacDougall -son of MacDougall of that ilk. and
3. Mary Matilda, born 12 .January 1764; married Edward Rishton of Elswick, and had issue.
4. Margaret, born 12 January 1765, died February 1769.
5. Anne. born 19 February 1768, married James Clarke of Inverness, and died without issue 5 June 1852.
Duntroon married secondly. 24 November 1772. .Jean, eldest daughter of Capt. Archibald Campbell of Blandfield. who was born 8 September 1751, and died 17 December 1798. He died at Madras, 12 July 1791, leaving issue--
James, born 3 September 1773, Lieut. 79th Regiment, killed at the Helder, 2 October 1799, unmarried.
Archibald, born 9 January 1775, died 5 February 1792.
Neil, born 1 May 1776, Knight, Major-General and Governor of Sierra Leone, where he died 14 August 1827.
Captain Niall Campbell. "now of Duntroon," gave up the Testament of the deceased laird 18 May 1763. On 10 August 1785 he went bankrupt, and, in the account of his liabilities, we find mention of his mother Mary, both his wives, and Beatrice, Jane. Mary and Anne (his children by the first marriage). and Archibald, Neil, Peter. Meredith. Jean and Helen (his younger children by the second marriage). The dates of both his marriage contracts are likewise given.
After his bankruptcy he was invited by Sir Archibald Campbell of Inverneil, Governor and Commander-in-chief of Madras, to join him there. Sir Archibald was his first cousin, their mothers having been sisters; and he appears to have had quite a following of needy Scottish kinsmen, for his term of office was long remembered in India as "The Scottish Invasion."
Duntroon was sold to Malcolm of Poltalloch at Captain Niall's bankruptcy, but I believe Oib was retained till about 1814.
[The Campbells of Duntroon by Herbert Campbell pub.1913]

2 - The burden of inherited debts, poor investments, and low estate income had put tremendous pressure on many of the local Lairds, who were to lose their estates as a result. Lairds such as Sir James Campbell of Auchenbreck, for example, had his estate sequestrated in 1762, while Archibald Campbell of Danna was forced to sell his estate in 1773 to pay the family's debts. The estates of Campbell of Ashfield, and of the MacNeills of Arichonan, were also in serious trouble by 1775, and with others such as the estate of Archibald Campbell's cousin, Captain Neil Campbell of Duntroon and Oib, it was only a matter of time, with the latter going bankrupt in 1785.
Campbell of Duntroon, in a vain attempt to save the family's estate or "the Old Bark" as he described it, subsequently took up a post with the Madras Presidency at the express invitation of Archibald Campbell, who was appointed governor of Madras in 1785. Duntroon was one of the lucky few able to secure such an appointment, because Archibald Campbell was inundated with applications from indigent kinsmen who wished to accompany him to India. This was referred to light-heartedly in a letter to Campbell of Inverneill from his friend Henry Dundas, who was a government minister and influential member of the Board of Control which had been set up in 1784 to oversee the management of the East India Company: "...the County of Argyll will be depopulated by the emigration of Campbells to be provided for by you". The Directors of the East India Company refused to allow Archibald Campbell more staff than was absolutely necessary, and many applications were to prove unsuccessful. It would appear, however, that Archibald Campbell succeeded in appointing enough of his kinsmen to senior posts, including the appointment of his nephew James Campbell (son of his elder brother, Sir James Campbell) as aide-de-camp, to merit his administration passing into the history of the East India Company as the "Scottish Invasion".
[ http://earlyamerica.com/review/2001_summer_fall/amer_war.html ]

3 - In 1771, the Duke of Argyll let the Campbeltown coal and salt works to Charles MacDowall for twenty-seven years. With some reluctance, Watt accepted the commission to carry out the survey of the isthmuses at Crinan and Tarbert. MacDowall hoped that, when Watt had finished at the top end of the Kintyre peninsula, he would come south and survey the line of a canal to link his mines at Drumlemble to Campbeltown. He tried to assist Watt by introducing him to a local laird:
"Mr Campbell of Duntroon lives on the Loch of Crinan, I have told him of the Survey which you are going to make, and you will find he will show you all manner of civility, and will assist you as far as he can, by finding a proper boat to carry you on your expeditions, & proper people to give you information & show you what you wish to see.
I beg you may write to me to Campbelltown after you have been a week in the highlands, I will be there about that time and will be glad to know what you are doing. "
[ http://www.kintyremag.co.uk/1999/29/page7.html ] 
Campbell, Capt. Neil of Duntroon Castle, and Oib (I15157)
 
28
1 - On 14 May 1752 Colin Campbell, the Red Fox, was killed in the Appin Murder at Ballachulish. Colin Campbell, landowner and government official, also known as The Red Fox, left his estate at Glenure with a group of soldiers, riding north through Appin to collect taxes. It has been claimed that his mission included the eviction of members of the Jacobite Stewarts, to be replaced by members of the government-loyal Campbell Clan. At Ballachuilish, a cairn marks the spot where Campbell was shot dead with a musket. Though the hapless James Stewart was hanged as a scapegoat for the crime, the true identity of the murderer remained a mystery for 250 years. However, in 2001 a descendant of the Stewarts of Appin, 89-year-old Anda Penman, identified young Donald Stewart of Ballachulish as the real killer, having allegedly kept a secret that was passed on by word of mouth through generations of her family.

The murder was dramatised in Robert Louis Stephenson's novel "Kidnapped"

2 - Patrick Campbell (b. 1677) had eight sons. The elder two, John and Colin, were destined to be practical landowners and were educated as 'gentlemen', partly with private tutors in Perth and Edinburgh and partly in the office of an Edinburgh lawyer, where they gained a smattering of the type of legal knowledge that was useful to modernising lairds.
By the early 1740s, with war in progress in Europe, four of the sons of Campbell of Barcaldine, now in their twenties or early thirties, were either in, or about to join, the army, mostly to serve with the Earl of Loudon's regiment. Colin, the second son, enjoyed the privileges of land inheritance and was a practical farmer, but he also craved the excitement and prizes that the army offered. He served on-and-off for nearly ten years and rose to the rank of captain, but suffered injury and resigned his commission in order to marry and develop his estate.
[ http://muse.jhu.edu/demo/scottish_historical_review/v085/85.1nenadic.html ]

3 - The chiefs and leaders of the clans, such as Ardsheal, were maintained in exile by what was known as the "second rent." The estates of Ardsheal, Collart and Mamore had been forfeited and the usual rents were collected for the Crown by Colin Campbell of Glenure, who had been appointed factor. The arrangement was naturally unpopular, but the factor tried to make the best of it by using James Stewart (James of the Glen) as a go-between with the various tenants on the Ardsheal Estate. On 14th May, 1752, Colin Campbell of Glenure was murdered and two days later James of the Glen was arrested. His trial began in the Old Inveraray Courthouse on 21st September before three judges and a jury of fifteen, of whom eleven were Campbells, with the Duke of Argyll as Lord Justice-General presiding. The accused was found guilty and condemned to death. On 8th November, of the same year- a day which was so stormy and wild that many felt the elements were protesting against the deed. He was hanged at Cnap Chaolis Mhic Pharuig, near the slip at Ballachulish Ferry.

There seems no doubt that, in the words of Andrew Lang, "James Stewart, to speak plain words, was judicially murdered." The political necessities of the times and the clan hatred of the Campbells against the Stewarts of Appin rigged a trial, packed the jury, and murdered an innocent man. There were, however, not a few including the man who was hanged, who knew the real culprit: and rarely in the history of human sacrifice has a secret been so well kept.

Colin Campbell of Glenure was eldest son of Patrick Campbell of Barcaldine, his mother being Lucia, daughter of Sir Ewan Cameron of Lochiel. As a Hanoverian, he fought against his own mother's people in the '45. While he was ambitious and thought to be planning the management of the forfeited estates for his own ultimate advantage, it must be allowed that he was in no ways oppressive in the execution of his distasteful and delicate duties as factor. James of the Glen helped him to collect the rents on the Stewart estates and they frequently consulted together.

Seumas a Ghlinne (James of the Glen) had been out in the '45, had been pardoned, and returned to occupy his tenancy of Glen Duror. Here he remained until 1751, when he was removed to Acharn on the lands of Campbell of Airds. Glen Duror was given by the factor to another Campbell--Campbell of Bailveolan, Lismore. James Stewart had a relative, Allan Breck Stewart, whom he had brought up from childhood on the death of his parents. Allan Breck has been described as a ne'er-do-weel, who joined the Hanoverian Army before the '45 and deserted to the Jacobites at Prestonpans. After Culloden he escaped to France and acted as a messenger between the Jacobites at home and those in exile. At the time of the murder of Colin Campbell he was in Appin, drinking and bragging a great deal, and threatening all kinds of mischief. He was particularly bitter against Campbell of Bailveolan, who had become tenant of Glen Duror in place of his foster father. There seems little doubt that Allan Breck stirred up a vengeful spirit amongst the young men, of whom Allan, the son of Seumas a Ghlinne, was prominent.

Glenure, the factor, had indicated that he had much less to fear from the Stewarts of Appin than from the Camerons. On 14th May, 1752, he was returning from a visit to- the Lochaber country, and when he got across Ballachulish Ferry he is supposed to have expressed his satisfaction in the words: "I am safe now that I am out of my mother's country." His party consisted of four others and they had "not a nail of arms among them." As they were passing along the road at the wood of Lettermore, a shot was fired from a bush near at hand and Glenure was killed. Shortly after the murder, while James Stewart was standing at his home speaking to a friend, a horseman was seen approaching at great speed. lames looked up and said, "Co sam bith am marca.'che cha tois fhein an t-eacw' ("whoever the rider may be, the horse is not his own"). The man coming with such great urgency was MacKenzie, Glenure's servant. When he told what happened, lames Stewart said prophetically, "Co sam bith an ciontach, is mise ,an crionlach" ("whoever may be the guilty one, I am the victim").

Two days later Seumas a Ghlinne was arrested and while in prison at Fort William he was denied all facilities for preparing his defence. As happened, however, he was defended with considerable skill, but it was obvious that the trial was "an impudent mockery" and his fate was decided before it began. Some time later a Campbell was taunted with the disgraceful justice meted out to lames Stewart. He replied proudly that anyone could get a guilty man hanged, but only MacCailein Mor could get an innocent man hanged.

Tradition holds that the condemned man, in addition to protesting his innocence in his last words on the scaffold, repeated the whole of Psalm xxxv. If this is true, the appropriateness of the words must have moved his friends deeply. Afterwards the Psalm is said to have been known as Salm Sheumais a Ghlinne (James of the Glen's Psalm).
The hanging took place on 8th November, 1752. From that date until April, 1754 -a period of eighteen months -a guard watched day and night to prevent the body being taken down by relatives and friends. When the body began to disintegrate the bones of the skeleton were joined together with wire and replaced on the gibbet. In January, 1754, what remained was blown down by a great storm. An enquiry was instituted to discover the cause and it was placed in position once more. One story says that the mortal remains of Seumas a Ghlinne found rest at last through the action of a half-wit, Mac a Phi a Chuthaich (daft Macphee), who overthrew the gallows and cast it into the sea, whence it floated down Loch Linnhe and up Loch Etive, landing near Bonawe. The last use to which it was -put was to form part of a wooden bridge over a stream. The bones are supposed to have been carefully gathered by young Stewart of Ballachulish, who placed them in the same coffin with the body of the mournful widow. Ballachulish's daughter, then about 10 years old, washed the skull of Seumas a Ghlinne with her own hands.

Of the 151 Crown witnesses at the trial, 36 were Stewarts, 26 McColls, 13 Campbells, 9 Colquhouns, 5 Macdonalds, and 2 Carmichaels. Amongst the Campbells was Bailveolain of Lismore. The most damaging witness against James Stewart was John Breck McColl, Bowman. He had been threatened by the relatives of the prisoner and asked the Crown authorities to have him arrested, so that his evidence would not appear voluntary and that he might seem to be under suspicion himself. Tradition says that Campbell of Bailveolain, who was involved in the case as a Campbell, as the tenant who took James Stewart's farm of Glenduror, as a special object of Allan Breck's enmity and threats, and as an active investigator of the crime, provided sanctuary for at least one of the Crown witnesses on his Lismore estate. The identity of this particular person is not certain.

Many years afterwards a young girl, Janet Macinnes, found in the hollow of a large elder tree an t-slinneachan (the shoulder piece), the gun from which death came to the factor. But who fired the fatal shot? The unanimous view of posterity is that James Stewart did not. The guilty person wished to confess, but was restrained by force by his own friends as well as those of the condemned man. Allan Breck, who was the evil genius of the unfortunate affair, accused Allan Beg, perhaps James Stewart's eldest son. Others have held that young Stewart of Ballachulish was the man who put an t-slinneachan to his shoulder and fired the fatal shot on Thursday, 14th May, 1752. But the truth is that, though several knew, none has divulged the secret, and speculation only serves to cast reflections on the innocent.

"I am not afraid to die," said Seumas a Ghlinne on the scaffold as he faced eternity, "but what grieves me is my character, that after ages should think me capable of such a horrid and barbarous murder." His fears were groundless: "after ages" have declared him an innocent man.

4 - After the Battle of Culloden (1746), the brother of King George II, Frederick, Duke of Cumberland (commonly called "The Butcher" ), set about destroying the clan system and Jacobite sympathies in the Scottish Highlands. Those sought out for special, spiteful and cruel punishment were the followers of Prince Charles Edward that remained in their lands. Cameron of Locheil ("Gentle Locheil") and the Stewart of Appin had fled to France and their lands, in many cases, were confiscated, the natives driven off and Factors (managers/ supervisors) were put in charge of their lands. This handed a nice profit to the factors whose task it was to rent out the lands to outsiders.

Colin Campbell of Glenure, also known as "Red Colin", was not present at Culloden although he held a commission in Lord Loudens regiment during the uprising. After resigning his commission, Glenure became one of these factors, having sway over the Cameron lands of Lochaber and Stewart lands in Appin. Let us pause a moment to reflect over the fact that most of the Scottish vs. English conflicts were in fact Scottish vs. English and Scottish. And so it was in the 1745 uprising. There was Scottish cavalry and foot soldiers fighting for the Hanovarian Government and quite a few clans came out for the Government such as Clan Gunn and Clan Campbell. Colin of Glenure's Mother was a Cameron of Locheil which added to the hatred towards him by members of Clan Cameron as they considered him to be a traitor. By his zeal in evicting and persecuting the hapless people of Lochaber and Appin, he accrued a lot of money and even more enemies than was good for his personal well being. An example of his actions can be found in an incident wherein he learned the whereabouts of a MacColl who had retrieved his own sequestered cattle. Colin set out to arrest him. Upon hearing of Colin's arrival, MacColl ran for it and Colin drew his gun. MacColls mother- in-law threw herself in the way and Colin shot her in the chest. Nothing more was said of this as Colin said that "she had no right to place herself between me and an outlaw".

The Laird of Fasnacloich owned some land on which some relatives of Colin were tenants. When the tenant's leases expired, Fasnacloich took back the land and re-let the lands to some Stewart relatives. When Colin heard of this he flew into an uncontrollable rage and swore an oath that he would now make sure that no person of the Cameron name would own one piece of Lochaber; and not one person of the Stewart name would own one piece of land in Appin. An important part in this tale appears now in the person of James Stewart of Ardshiel, brother of the exiled Charles Stewart of Ardshiel. He rented land very cheaply from Colin of Glenure. At one point he was even a sub-factor for Colin. He collected the rents, kept as much of it as he needed for himself and gave the balance to his exiled brothers wife, The Lady of Ardshiel. She in turn used the money to assist exiled Jacobites in France. Some blabber-mouth reported this to Colin. After the prosecution and conviction of James (also known as James of the Glen), he was stripped of all his possessions and left impecunious. He succumbed to alcohol and through the drink became a loud mouth and a braggart. His behavior became bellicose and belligerent in tone. He never let a chance go by without bad-mouthing Colin Campbell of Glenure. A local wag, in front of a crowd seeking to have sport with James, asked him what he would do if he saw Colin Campbell hanging on the gallows. James unfortunately replied that he would pull on his legs. A remark like that alongside many others in the same vein were remembered; and would come back and (as we say today) bite him! With so many people hating him, it is small wonder that there were attempts upon his life.

The people of Lochaber knew where Colin usually took an afternoon stroll and the Laird of Callart took a gun and was determined to put a bullet through Colin and rid the Highlands of him. The plan went awry when someone accosted Colin and they went back to the house. Callart spent the night with the Laird of Fasnacloich and it was probably there that the beginning of the plot to kill Colin was begun. They convened a meeting between some men of Lochaber and Appin near a place called Glenstockdale, but far enough away that no shots could be heard. Those that met decided that as they only had three guns between them, the best shot should be fired from the best gun, regardless of ownership. Donald Stewart, a nephew of The Laird of Ballachulish, had a good Spanish gun; the Laird of Fasnacloich also had a Spanish gun; Dugald MacColl had a double-barreled Spanish gun called the "Slinneanach". They all took turns at firing all three guns and it was decided that Dugald's double-barrelled gun, the Slinneanach, was the best gun and that Donald Stewart was the best shot. The Laird of Fasnacloich was the second best shot so he was chosen as companion to Donald Stewart.

Colin of Glenure and his nephew Mungo were returning from Lochaber where they had completed some evictions and collected some rents. He never felt safe in Cameron country, the land of his Mother - and who knows what his Mother thought of him - and felt more secure in the lands of Appin and Argyle. It was on that day, those who were to settle the final score put themselves into the order they had decided upon. Donald and Fasnacloich were on the southern bank of Loch Linnhe, after Ballachulish. Others in the plot, The Laird of Callart and the Laird of Onich were on watch at Onich; while Big Donald MacMartin of Dochnassay was at Corran with John Stewart (not to be confused with Ardsheil). Colin, Mungo and a young ghillie named John MacKenzie passed Corran without mishap. Big Donald berated his companion, John Stewart, for being asleep when the party passed by - and he, in turn berated Big Donald for being late anyway. As the ill fated party passed Onich and now being aware of hostiles in the area, ghillie John MacKenzie rode closer to Colin to protect him. As MacKenzie was a local man and a neighbor, they were afraid to fire lest they hurt the wrong man. Big Donald went after Colin's party until he reached Onich where the Lairds of Callart and Onich had lain in wait. Big Donald was furious that they had passed unscathed again. He told them he did not care if MacKenzie was in the way or not, they should have shot them both. After berating them more he sat down and said that he would wait until he heard the shot from the other side of the Loch, as he was sure Donald Stewart and Fasnacloich would perform a better job than his bungling companions Upon meeting the Laird of Ballachulish and refusing his offer of overnight hospitality; also refusing to listen to Archie MacInnes,the ferryman with one eye and second sight, Colin crossed that part of Loch Linnhe and proceeded in the direction of Ardsheil where he had some important evictions to perform. Colin and Mungo rode ahead of Laird Ballachulish and the ghillie. Colin and Mungo reached the Black Rock near the entrance to the woods at Lettermore. It was there that Donald fired the long double-barreled "Slinneanach" and two balls hit Colin in his left side between his ribs and armpit. His horse reared and threw Colin against a post and to the ground. He never spoke again. As Mungo tried to staunch the life's blood that was flowing out of his uncle, there passed a woman with a new linen shawl around her shoulders. Mungo asked her to sell it to him and she replied in the negative saying that she had bought the shawl at the shop and if he wanted one then he should go and buy one himself. Mungo pleaded that this was Colin Campbell of Glenure and he had been shot and was dying, to which she is supposed to have replied, "Then let the hunter drink his soup".

Mungo sent John MacKenzie to get help from a relative at Kentallan. The relative not being home, he rode on to Aucharn where he told James Stewart of Ardshiel the horrifying news. James wanted to go and help as, asked to, but his wife forbade it. She was afraid of what would happen to him in the midst of so many Campbells. Reminding himself of his past boasting and bitter utterances against Glenure; he said that no matter who did it , they would blame him. And blame him they did. He was arrested, tried and convicted on perjured testimony and hanged. This became a very famous case in Scottish legal history which deserves a complete story of its own and has already been written about extensively (See "Notable British Trials" by D.N.Mackay). Now we have the aftermath of the trial. The Campbell Clan ransacked the Appin territories looking for recompense. Someone informed the Sheriff that the Laird of Fasnacloich had been seen the same day as the murder, armed and on the moors. he was brought in and tried and acquitted for lack of evidence A new character appears in the person of a gentleman named Allan Breck.

There were not many gentlemen in the region who could be counted upon to be above suspicion and they feared for their lives and their property. On receipt of a certain amount of money, Allan Breck of the Stewart clan fled to France and wrote a letter of confession to the killing of Colin. The letter did not arrive in time to help James Stewart of Ardsheil. Breck joined the French army and received a commission and fought in the British-French war in North America. A story handed down relates that Breck's French troops had encircled the British force and would annihilate them at dawn. Breck went to the British camp where he knew there were many men from Argyle and out of kinsmanship, left a break in the circle by which they could escape. While he was with the men of Argyle, he gave the officer a letter recanting his confession to the murder.

Some years later the same nephew of the Laird of Ballachulish, Donald Stewart, was out hunting on the moor with the younger brother of Colin Glenure, Alexander. Donald had the long double-barreled "Slinneanach" with him and shot a stag. Upon inspection Alexander noted that the two balls were exactly the same as those that shot his brother. Donald retorted that if Alexander suspected him in complicity of his brother's death, then he would not leave this moor alive today. Alexander backed down but their friendship cooled after that incident. General John Campbell of Manmore succeeded as the new Duke of Argyle and was made inspector of all Scottish castles. Part of his route passed near Ballachulish whereupon the Laird went out and offered the Duke overnight hospitality. After ingratiating himself into the Duke's good graces, the Duke gave them a parcel of woodland from which he may earn an extra living. The relations between the Campbells and Stewarts grew warmer than at any time since the murder of Colin Campbell of Glenure.

The letter from Allan Breck would have cleared James Stewart if it had arrived in time. Now the actual culprits will never be officially known and the killers did go free.
(Colin Campbell of Glenure by J J Jardine from Scottish Journal, August 1999) 
Campbell, Colin of Glenure (I15146)
 
29
1 - youngest daughter.

2 - Matilda Campbell died in childbirth 9/23/1769 having daughter Neilliadh (Nelly) Helen Campbell birth-date 9/23/1769. Father was Capt. Neil Campbell.
[E-mail from Beth Campbell rec: 26 Jul 2019] 
Campbell, Matilda (I15156)
 
30
Death Date: May 1978
Issuing State: CA
Residence at Death: HANFORD, KINGS, CA
SSN: 556-70-5084 
McCall, Carol Elizabeth (I6272)
 
31
William McCall
Birth 9 Nov 1846 North Cove, McDowell County, North Carolina, USA
Death 26 May 1929 (aged 82) Marion, McDowell County, North Carolina, USA
Burial Oak Grove Cemetery Marion, McDowell County, North Carolina, USA

Memorial ID 82366069 · View Source

Memorial
Photos 1
Flowers 4

North Carolina Death Certificate:
Name: William McCall
Gender: Male
Race: White
Age: 82
Birth Date: 9 Nov 1846
Birth Place: North Cove, McDowell
Death Date: 26 May 1929
Death Location: Marion, McDowell
Father's Name: Wm A McCall
Mother's Name: Kathryn McCall
Informant: R E McCall, Marion, NC
Burial: Oak Grove, Marion, NC May 28, 1929 
McCall, William (I6327)
 
32
[YALE UNIVERSITY]
OBITUARY RECORD
OF GRADUATES OF THE
UNDERGRADUATE SCHOOLS
DECEASED DURING THE YEAR
ENDING JUNE 30, 1952

WILLIAM HOWE WARREN, B. A. 1901. Born September 28, 1879, Holden, Mass.; died June 25, 1952, Holden, Mass.
Father, Henry Waterman Warren, 1865, cardleather manufacturer. Mother, Dora Louise (Howe) Warren. Yale relatives include: Henry Waterman Warren, 1865 (father); Henry Waterman Warren, II (Class of '40S) (son).
Worcester (Mass.) Classical High School. Valedictorian; Phi Beta Kappa; Beta Theta Phi.

Accountant, director, 1901, secretary of corporation, in charge of office, assistant treasurer. 1919, treasurer, J. F. & W. H. Warren Co., name changed in 1919. Warren Belting Co., Inc., manufacturers of leather belting, Worcester, Mass., director. Howard Brothers Manufacturing Co.; trustee. Public Library; director, secretary, Holden (Mass.) Hospital; secretary, treasurer, First Baptist Society, Holden; member. Holden Republican Town Committee, legal Advisory Board. 13th District. Mass.; Town Club.
Married April 27, 1911, Holden, Mass., Editha M. Brierly, daughter of John T. Brierly, dealer in mill supplies, and Julia E. (Pierce) Brierly. Children: Barbara; Henry Waterman, II (Class of 1940); William Howe, Jr.
Survived by wife, daughter, and two Sons. 
Warren, William Howe (I68)
 
33
Data from United States Federal Census Records
1880 - living with his parents in New York, New York.
1900 - living with his parents in New York, New York.
1910 - living in Reedville, Washington County, Oregon with his wife Helen; occupation clerk at the Oregon Nursery Company.
1920 - inmate at the Oregon State Insane Asylum; marital status married.

Alfred was shown as a traveling salesman on his marriage license.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------



Data from United States Federal Census Records
1880 - living with his parents in New York, New York.
1900 - living with his parents in New York, New York.
1910 - living in Reedville, Washington County, Oregon with his wife Helen; occupation clerk at the Oregon Nursery Company.
1920 - inmate at the Oregon State Insane Asylum; marital status married.

Alfred was shown as a traveling salesman on his marriage license.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------



Data from United States Federal Census Records
1880 - living with his parents in New York, New York.
1900 - living with his parents in New York, New York.
1910 - living in Reedville, Washington County, Oregon with his wife Helen; occupation clerk at the Oregon Nursery Company.
1920 - inmate at the Oregon State Insane Asylum; marital status married.

Alfred was shown as a traveling salesman on his marriage license.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------



US Federal Census Data:
1880 - living in New York, New York with his parents.
1900 - living in New York, New York with his parents.
1910 - living in Reedville, Washington County, Oregon with his wife Helen; occupation clerk at the Oregon Nursery Company.
1920 - inmate at the Oregon State Insane Asylum; marital status married.

Alfred was noted as a traveling salesman on his marriage license. 
Jeselson, Alfred (I8173)
 
34
Data from United States Federal Census Records
1900 - living in Tacoma, Pierce County, Washington as a lodger; occupation as a brakeman - (NCR. or NPR).
1910 - living in Hoquiam, Chehalis County, Washington in the home of his mother-in-law with his wife Dora and daughter Inez B., age 5; occupation street car conductor.
1920 - living in Salem, Marion County, Oregon with his wife Dora, daughter Inez ,age 15, son C. Chesley, age 9 and son Clyde P., age 2 6/12; occupation carpenter in sash and door factory.
1930 - living in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California in the home of his mother with his sister Helen and his son Clyde P., age 12; marital status widowed; occupation driver, transportation. 
Campbell, John Roy (I8147)
 
35
Data from United States Federal Census Records
1900 - living with her parents and was a student.
1910 - living in Reedville, Washington County, Oregon with her husband Alfred; occupation stenographer at the Oregon Nursery Company.
1920 - living alone in Portland, Mulnomah County, Oregon; listed as married and occupation professional reader.
1930 - living her with widowed mother Ida in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California; marital status divorced and occupation newspaper reporter.
1940 - living with her widowed mother in San Simeon, San Luis Obispo County, California; marital status divorced and occupation professional writer.

In October of 1962 she wrote a letter from Cambria, California to her great great nephew Christopher Charles welcoming him into the family and stated that she (at 78 years) was the "oldest member of the Campbell clan now living" (I assume descendants of Charles Henry, son of Argyle).

-- MERGED NOTE ------------



Data from United States Federal Census Records
1900 - living with her parents and was a student.
1910 - living in Reedville, Washington County, Oregon with her husband Alfred; occupation stenographer at the Oregon Nursery Company.
1920 - living alone in Portland, Mulnomah County, Oregon; listed as married and occupation professional reader.
1930 - living her with widowed mother Ida in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California; marital status divorced and occupation newspaper reporter.
1940 - living with her widowed mother in San Simeon, San Luis Obispo County, California; marital status divorced and occupation professional writer.

In October of 1962 she wrote a letter from Cambria, California to her great great nephew Christopher Charles welcoming him into the family and stated that she (at 78 years) was the "oldest member of the Campbell clan now living" (I assume descendants of Charles Henry, son of Argyle).

-- MERGED NOTE ------------



Data from United States Federal Census Records
1900 - living with her parents and was a student.
1910 - living in Reedville, Washington County, Oregon with her husband Alfred; occupation stenographer at the Oregon Nursery Company.
1920 - living alone in Portland, Mulnomah County, Oregon; listed as married and occupation professional reader.
1930 - living her with widowed mother Ida in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California; marital status divorced and occupation newspaper reporter.
1940 - living with her widowed mother in San Simeon, San Luis Obispo County, California; marital status divorced and occupation professional writer.

In October of 1962 she wrote a letter from Cambria, California to her great great nephew Christopher Charles welcoming him into the family and stated that she (at 78 years) was the "oldest member of the Campbell clan now living" (I assume descendants of Charles Henry, son of Argyle).

-- MERGED NOTE ------------



US Federal Census Data:
1900 - living in Summer, Pierce County, Washington with her parents and was a student.
1910 - living in Reedville, Washington County, Oregon with her husband Alfred; occupation stenographer at the Oregon Nursery Company.
1920 - living alone in Portland, Mulnomah County, Oregon; listed as married and occupation professional reader.
1930 - living her with widowed mother Ida in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California; marital status divorced and occupation newspaper reporter.
1940 - living with her widowed mother in San Simeon, San Luis Obispo County, California; marital status divorced and occupation professional writer.

In October of 1962 she wrote a letter from Cambria, California to her great great nephew Christopher Charles welcoming him into the family and stated that she (at 78 years) was the "oldest member of the Campbell clan now living" (I assume descendants of Charles Henry, son of Argyle). 
Campbell, Helen Belle (I8146)
 
36
Data from United States Federal Census Records
1930 - Ida was head of household living in Los Angeles, Los Angles County, California with daughter Helen, son John Roy and grandson Clyde P. Campbell, age 14.
 
US Federal Census Data:
1860 - living in Union, Mahaska County, Iowa with parents
1870 - living in Union, Mahaska County, Iowa with parents
1930 - living in Los Angeles, Los Angles County, California, Ida was head of household  with daughter Helen, son John Roy and grandson Clyde P. Campbell
  
Watkins, Ida Iowa (I8145)
 
37
Data from United States Federal Census Records
1910 - living in Belpre, Washington County, Ohio as head of household with wife Fannie and son child Edward M., age 15; occupation portrait artist (probably an error, Fannie seems to be the artist)
1920 - living in Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio as a boarder at 1434 West 6th Street; shown as married

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

US Federal Census data:
1910
In Belpre, Washington County, Ohio - head of household with wife, Fannie, child Edward M. age 15
Occupation - portrait artist (probably an error, Fannie seems to be the artist)
Year of immigration 1881
1920
In Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio - shown as a boarder at 1434 West 6th Street, also as married

-- MERGED NOTE ------------



Data from United States Federal Census Records
1910 - living in Belpre, Washington County, Ohio as head of household with wife Fannie and son child Edward M., age 15; occupation portrait artist (probably an error, Fannie seems to be the artist)
1920 - living in Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio as a boarder at 1434 West 6th Street; shown as married

-- MERGED NOTE ------------



US Federal Census Data:
1910 - living in Belpre, Washington County, Ohio as head of household with wife Fannie and son child Edward M., age 15; occupation portrait artist (probably an error, Fannie seems to be the artist)
1920 - living in Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio as a boarder at 1434 West 6th Street; shown as married 
May, Patrick J. (I8137)
 
38
Family History [photocopy of hand-written account by Cora Belle Campbell McCall, held by John Brierly McCall. no date but ends with 1934]

Clarence Field McCall was born in Reform, MO. on August 11, 1881 the sixth of the seven children of Kemuel and Maggie McCall. He graduated from Westminster College in Fulton in 1900. Cora Belle Campbell was born in Joliet, Ill. on Nov 17, 1878, the fourth of five children of Merritt and Lillie Campbell. The family moved to Claremont, Calif in 1891. Cora graduated from the University of California in 1901. These two met at the Bible Teachers' Training School in New York in the fall of 1907. They were married in Los Angeles July 14, 1908 and sailed for Japan in the following September as missionaries of the United Christian Missionary Society (Disciples of Christ). We spent our first winter in Osaka and moved to Akita in May, 1909. There we lived for a year in the little Japanese house where Merritt was born on September 16. We spent the winter of 1910-11 in Tokyo and then returned to Akita and lived until 1929 in the big mission home. Field was born there in 1912. Robert was born in a Tokyo hospital on April 28, 1914 and died in Akita on Dec 20 1915. Frances was born in Karuizawa in 1915. In March 1916 we went to America on our first furlough. We spent the summer in Miss. and one year in Claremont and one in Long Beach and returned to Akita in August 1918. Merritt died in May 1920. Field and Frances studied the Calvert Course until we went to Oberlin, Ohio is 1925. They were in school there and when we returned Field entered the Canadian Academy in Kobe where he stayed for three years. In 1929 we went to Tokyo for a year. Father taught in Aoyama Gakuin. Field and Frances entered the American School and Mother studied in the Japanese Language School. In the fall of 1930 we went to Niigata having joined the American Board Mission. Field and Frances lived in the school dormitories after that. Field graduated in June 1931 and went to America to enter Berea College. Frances graduated in 1933 and went to Berea returning home with Field and Bill Murphy who had come to spend the summer. We had a delightful time for six weeks, visited Akita to see our old home and friends and the graves of Merritt and Robert.

In April 1934 while looking forward to our furlough we were asked by our Board to consider going to Micronesia and they suggested that Father should go to see the field and look into the work which he did while Mother stayed in Karuizawa recuperating from a very serious operation performed in the February before.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------


Family History [photocopy of hand-written account by Cora Belle Campbell McCall, held by John Brierly McCall. no date but ends with 1934]

Clarence Field McCall was born in Reform, MO. on August 11, 1881 the sixth of the seven children of Kemuel and Maggie McCall. He graduated from Westminster College in Fulton in 1900. Cora Belle Campbell was born in Joliet, Ill. on Nov 17, 1878, the fourth of five children of Merritt and Lillie Campbell. The family moved to Claremont, Calif in 1891. Cora graduated from the University of California in 1901. These two met at the Bible Teachers' Training School in New York in the fall of 1907. They were married in Los Angeles July 14, 1908 and sailed for Japan in the following September as missionaries of the United Christian Missionary Society (Disciples of Christ). We spent our first winter in Osaka and moved to Akita in May, 1909. There we lived for a year in the little Japanese house where Merritt was born on September 16. We spent the winter of 1910-11 in Tokyo and then returned to Akita and lived until 1929 in the big mission home. Field was born there in 1912. Robert was born in a Tokyo hospital on April 28, 1914 and died in Akita on Dec 20 1915. Frances was born in Karuizawa in 1915. In March 1916 we went to America on our first furlough. We spent the summer in Miss. and one year in Claremont and one in Long Beach and returned to Akita in August 1918. Merritt died in May 1920. Field and Frances studied the Calvert Course until we went to Oberlin, Ohio is 1925. They were in school there and when we returned Field entered the Canadian Academy in Kobe where he stayed for three years. In 1929 we went to Tokyo for a year. Father taught in Aoyama Gakuin. Field and Frances entered the American School and Mother studied in the Japanese Language School. In the fall of 1930 we went to Niigata having joined the American Board Mission. Field and Frances lived in the school dormitories after that. Field graduated in June 1931 and went to America to enter Berea College. Frances graduated in 1933 and went to Berea returning home with Field and Bill Murphy who had come to spend the summer. We had a delightful time for six weeks, visited Akita to see our old home and friends and the graves of Merritt and Robert.

In April 1934 while looking forward to our furlough we were asked by our Board to consider going to Micronesia and they suggested that Father should go to see the field and look into the work which he did while Mother stayed in Karuizawa recuperating from a very serious operation performed in the February before. 
Campbell, Cora Belle (I13)
 
39
Worcester Evening Gazette,
Monday, March 26, 1928, pg. 15

JOHN T. BRIERLY
DIES IN FLORIDA
Widely Known Retired Head of
Brierly-Lombard Co. Made
Home in Holden

John T. Brierly, 74 years old, of Holden, for many years a widely known Worcester business man, died Saturday in Orlando, Fla. Mr. Brierly was born in Millbury April 21, 1854.
On graduating from the Millbury High school he became associated with his father in cotton manufacturing. He held a position in the woolen mill of Ashworth & Jones, Valley Falls, and later became superintendent of the Brick City mill at Cherry Valley. Two years after he associated himself with the Sumner-Pratt Co. of Worcester, a business founded in 1847, being one of the oldest mill supply houses in New England.
The firm of Sumner-Pratt & Co. became Crawford & Co., in 1898, Mr. Brierly being the junior partner, and in October, 1909, upon the retirement of Mr. Crawford, Mr. Brierly became the sole owner. In January, 1910, the Lombard Machine Co., consolidated with Mr. Brierly under the name of Brierly-Lombard Co., with Mr. Brierly as president, treasurer and general manager.
He was a director of the Whittaker Reed Co. of Worcester and the Worcester Collateral Loan Association. He was a member of the Rotary Club and the Worcester County Mechanics association, was a past noble grand of the Anchoria Lodge, I. O. O. F., one of the charter members and a member Regulus lodge of Knights of Pythias.
Mr. Brierly was an active worker in Pilgrim Church, Worcester, until his removal with his family to Holden, where he became a member of the Congregational church of that town.
He interested himself in all town matters, serving on many of the important committees, especially at the time of the installation of the town water system.
After his retirement from business he spent most of his time in Holden until the death of his wife, Julia E. Pierce, in October, 1923, when it became his custom to spend his winter in the South.
He leaves four daughters: Mrs. George W. Field of Scarsdale, N. Y.; Mrs. Eugene A. Copeland of Worcester; Mrs. William H. Warren and Mrs. William J. Jamieson of Holden; 12 grandchildren; a brother Charles E., and two sisters, Elizabeth A., and Mrs. Albert W. Libby, all of Worcester.
The funeral will be tomorrow in Holden at a time and place to be announced. 
Brierly, John Thomas (I95)
 
40
Alexander, along with the next two sons, Archibald and Robert, were each provided with merchant apprenticeships—two in Glasgow and one in Stirling.
Archibald stuck with commercial pursuits in Glasgow for a period, but was bored and longed for something more exciting. As he wrote to brother Duncan,
"I can only give my mind to forming encampments, sieges and battles, my mind is so entirely hurried in castle building that now I'm a Captain then a Colonel sometimes a General but in a few minutes coming to myself after I have moved in those high stations I find the General reduced to a fifth brother that has neither credit nor money to purchase an Ensign's staff."
The money was found, however, and he entered the army soon after, only to die abroad of fever in 1754.
[ http://muse.jhu.edu/demo/scottish_historical_review/v085/85.1nenadic.html ] 
Campbell, Archibald (I15140)
 
41
Alexander, the fifth son, was intended by his father to be a clergyman, but he objected so loudly to this as a boy that his father relented. In the absence of other avenues and mindful of cost, Alexander, along with the next two sons, Archibald and Robert, were each provided with merchant apprenticeships—two in Glasgow and one in Stirling.
Alexander—whom his father had wanted to be a clergyman—had soon given up on his business career and, like Allan, spent several years as a tenant farmer on his brother's estate before joining the army and also rising to lieutenant. He was seriously injured in 1748 and after two years on half pay he returned to farming in Argyll, but died in 1751, having never fully recovered.
[ http://muse.jhu.edu/demo/scottish_historical_review/v085/85.1nenadic.html ] 
Campbell, Lieut. Alexander (I15137)
 
42
AmericanAncestors.org: Vital Records from the New England Historical and Genealogical Register
Volume: 9 Page(s): 51

1855


ORIGIN OF MENDON AND THE NAME OF MEDWAY.
Moses Paine and Peter Bracket of Braintree for £24 purchased of Indians in 1660 a tract 8 ms. square situated about 15 ms. from Meadfield and bounded 1 m. to the E. of a small River which lyeth about 3 ms. E. of Nipmugg great Pond and from that line 8 ms. W. and to extend 3 ms. S. of the path to that pond and 5 ms. on the other side. They with other associates subsequently petioned for the incorporation of Mendon; and in 1662 the following persons were accepted to allotments of land to be
settled there before the end of 7 mo. 1663, viz.

from Braintree:
John Moore
George Aldrich
Nathl. Haseman
Alexander Plumbly
Mathias Puffer
John Woodland
Ferdinando Teare
Daniel Lovet
John Harber
Josiah Chapin
Joseph Penieman
John Small
John Gurney

From Weymouth:
Goodman King
Walter Cook
Wm Holbrook
Joseph White
Goodman Thompson
Goodman Raynes
Goodman Bolter senr.
Abraham Staples
Samuel Pratt
Tho Bolter

Their nearest place for supplies was Medfield, and in passing back and forth they found their Midway where Medway Village now stands, and gave it the name; still preserved in that locality in spite of the error of the clerk 140 years ago, defeating the wish of petitioners for a new town, and fastening upon the place the corporate name of Medway.

Sherborn, August 18th, 1854.
ABNER MORSE. 
Aldrich, George II (I14371)
 
43
Arrived in Australia December 1871 aboard "Duke of Edinburgh" Mary is listed as aged 19 and listed under the spelling of Wolfenden. 
Woolfenden, Mary Jane (I4562)
 
44
Assumed to be of the original Danna line. John must have dsp or dspm as Danna passed to Archibald Campbell of the Kilmory line who was forced to sell the estate in 1773 to pay the family's debts. 
Campbell, John of Danna (I15165)
 
45
Billerica, Middlesex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial AmericaDeath12 January 1754Bedford, Middlesex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, 
Bacon, Jonathan (I12770)
 
46
Campbell of Barcaldine, middling lairds from the Appin area of northern Argyll.31 Patrick Campbell (b. 1677) had eight sons who came to adulthood in the period from the 1720s to the 1740s. His plans for their future careers, which were extensively discussed within the kin network, were entirely consistent with gentry strategies for maximising the interest of the family as a whole. As was usual in such families, the opportunities made available to older boys were always better than those of the younger, with greater sums spent on education or training for those higher in the sibling hierarchy. The elder two, John and Colin, were destined to be practical landowners and were educated as 'gentlemen' The third son, Duncan, with little likelihood of inheriting land (though in the event he did succeed to an estate) was trained to be a professional lawyer. Through a combination of a good income from his practice and business acumen, he was able to accumulate a significant landholding of his own and was by far the most successful of Patrick Campbell's sons. The fourth son Allan was educated in a similar way to the elder two, but not with the intention of land ownership, but rather to be a substantial tenant on his family estate, a tacksman, and also a 'man of business' for the head of the family. Alexander, the fifth son, was intended by his father to be a clergyman, but he objected so loudly to this as a boy that his father relented. Alexander, along with the next two sons, Archibald and Robert, were each provided with merchant apprenticeships— two in Glasgow and one in Stirling. Finally, the youngest son, Donald, was apprenticed to a tradesman, an Edinburgh 'cherurgeon', for three-years of training in the practical skills of the surgeon.
None of Patrick Campbell's sons was destined for a military career, but with military opportunities about to rise, it is not surprising that in adulthood five of these men turned their ambitions to such employment.
It is striking to note that three of the four younger sons of Patrick Campbell died prematurely, unmarried, undistinguished and poor as a result of their military service— and the brothers who remained outside the army lived longer, were married and produced thriving families. In the wake of the Jacobite rebellion, loyal government service, in both the army and as Crown Factors (offices held by the two elder brothers) will have helped the political fortunes of this family, who, though mostly Whig, had close marriage connections with several local Jacobite families.
[ http://muse.jhu.edu/demo/scottish_historical_review/v085/85.1nenadic.html ] 
Campbell, Patrick 4th of Barcaldine (I15126)
 
47
Campbell, Collie, admitted 3 Aug. 1762, fourth son of John Campbell of Barcaldine.
(THE FACULTY OF ADVOCATES OF SCOTLAND 1532-1943 WITH GENEALOGICAL NOTES 1944) 
Campbell, Colin (I15159)
 
48
Described as "old school Baptist preacher" in family papers

Moses Greer Jr. was born on 12 May 1768 in Franklin County, VA. He died on 30 Sept 1848 in Franklin County, VA. He was buried in Gogginsville, Franklin County, VA. "Moses Greer settled in Franklin County. He was a Primitive Baptist minister, and baptized Thomas Bailey Greer (brother), Chattin D. Pollard (brother - in - law) and Theoderick F. Webb (sister - in - law's brother). ..... He was born, lived and died in Franklin County. He and his wife were buried at the old homestead near Gogginsville." (Pioneer Families of Franklin County, Virginia, 1935 by Marshall Wingfield, pages 86 and 87, as taken from "The Genealogy of the Greer Family" by Joseph Hampton Greer, pages 2, 3 and 4. His and his wife's birth and death dates and their children are listed.)

In 1832, Moses Greer, Jr., was a Justice of the Peace in Franklin County and stated at that time, that he had served several tours under Moses Greer, Senior, against the Tories." (GREAR - GREER - GREERE - GRIER, about 1954, by Robert M. Torrence, A.B., F.G.S.P., F.I.A.G; 110 Edgevale Road, Baltimore 10, Maryland, pages 24 - 25.)

He was married to Susannah Wood (daughter of Stephen Wood Sr. and Ann Smith) on 4 Nov 1794 in Franklin County, VA. Susannah Wood was born on 29 Nov 1776. She died on 29 Nov 1857 in Franklin County, VA. She was buried in Gogginsville, Franklin County, VA. 
Greer, Moses Jr. (I1242)
 
49
Donald Barber at

A deep mystery surrounds Jane, wife of Thomas. He married her in 1640, but the written record by Matthew Grant gives only
the name Jane or Joan. Two of Thomas's sons married COGGIN ladies, but there is little sign that Jane was a Coggin, as some have
suggested. One report (LDS record) has it that Jane COGGIN, b Bedfordshire ENG 1619 was daughter of John COGGIN, b in
Bedford, Bedfordshire about 1593.

It has also been suggested that Thomas BARBER married Jane BANCROFT, widow of John BANCROFT who died in 1637. Jane
Bancroft had ties to Windsor thru her daughter Anna, b 1627, who married 1647 John GRIFFIN of Windsor and Simsbury, and her
son John, born about 1620, who married in 1650 Hannah DUPPER and had a family in Windsor. But Jane BONYTHON who married
John BANCROFT was born in 1573, and would have been way too old to have borne Thomas BARBER’s children. This theory
against the wife being Jane Bancroft was written up in The American Genealogist, Vol 37, p 164, in 1961 by George E McCracken and
more or less disproved at that time. He points out that she would have had to have borne children for too long a time span - highly
unlikely, and also she would have had 2 sons named John and 2 named Thomas - also unlikely. Another account has John
BANCROFT born about 1596, died 1637, m. Jane about 1622. That would have meant she was born about 1606 or before, making
her about 47 in 1653 when Thomas’s youngest child Josiah Barber was born - not impossible, but very unlikely.

It has been said by some that Thomas may have married the daughter of one of the Dutch traders at Old Saybrook, or Hartford,
and also that the one he married was “the first white woman to land in Connecticut”.

One of Francis STILES' sisters was named Jane, born 1605. She married in England and presumably remained there. There
was a Jane MORDEN or WORDEN, age 35 (in 1635), on the passenger list of the Christian; however I know nothing further about
her. It seems she was too old to have borne all of Thomas's children.

There seems as yet no way of knowing who Jane was (an all too frequent problem in genealogy). [~ Windsor Hist Soc:Jay Mack
Holbrook, 1992; 1909 Barber Gen; Barbour Index; Lyman Barber Gen; Stiles:Windsor; Lure of the Litchfield Hills ~] 
Family: Barber, Sgt Thomas / Coggin, Jane (F2806)
 
50
Ezekiel was a representative of Worcester to the Massachusetts legislature ("General Court") in 1777. Elizabeth died there and was buried in the cemetery formerly in the town common, and she is included in an epitaph transcription of the yard. Interments and surviving gravestones there (they were laid flat and buried in 1853) were transferred to Hope Cemetery in the 1960s. Hope hasn't yet been checked for a gravestone. Ezekiel brought his second wife Sarah and her daughters Elizabeth and Sarah to Shrewsbury, where they are said to have lived on the property occupied by Nathan Pratt in 1847.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Ezekiel moved to Worcester from Marlborough about 1742. Although all his children were probably baptized, there wasn't an established minister at Worcester. Son Ebenezer's baptism, which took place at Worcester, appears in the records of the minister at Weston, MA (and is included in the town's published vital records), who traveled in the region to perform those rites. Ezekiel was a representative of Worcester to the Massachusetts legislature ("General Court") in 1777. (1) Elizabeth died there and was buried in the cemetery formerly in the town common, and she is included in an epitaph transcription of the yard. Interments and surviving gravestones there (they were laid flat and buried in 1853) were transferred to Hope Cemetery in the 1960s. Hope hasn't yet been checked for a gravestone. Ezekiel brought his second wife Sarah and her daughters Elizabeth and Sarah to Shrewsbury, where they are said to have lived on the property occupied by Nathan Pratt in 1847. 
Howe, Ezekiel (I1815)
 

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